HYSTEROSCOPY

A hysteroscope is a telescope-like device that is inserted into the uterus via the vagina and cervix to visualise the endometrial (uterine) and endocervical (neck of the womb) cavity. The hysteroscope transmits the image of your uterus onto a screen.

HYSTEROSCOPY OVERVIEW

The development of hysteroscopy has provided a ‘minimally invasive’ approach to common gynaecological problems such as abnormal uterine bleeding.

  • Better clinician training, improved technologies, smaller diameter hysteroscopes and increased emphasis on office-based procedures have led to a widespread use of this important technology.

A hysteroscope is a telescope-like device that is inserted into the uterus via the vagina and cervix to visualise the endometrial (uterine) and endocervical (neck of the womb) cavity. The hysteroscope transmits the image of your uterus onto a screen.

Hysteroscopy can be performed for diagnostic or therapeutic (treatment) indications. Other instruments are used along with the hysteroscope for treatment.

INDICATIONS FOR HYSTEROSCOPY

Hysteroscopy is performed for the evaluation or treatment of the endometrial and/or endocervical canal in women with:

  • Abnormal premenopausal or postmenopausal uterine bleeding from a variety of causes
  • Subfertility, including intrauterine adhesions/scar tissue (Asherman syndrome)
  • Removal of foreign bodies e.g. intrauterine device
  • Congenital uterine anomalies (abnormalities in the embryological formation of the womb)
  • Concerns/observations on pelvic ultrasound scan or other imaging CT/MRI.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF HYSTEROSCOPY?

Hysteroscopy is generally a very safe procedure. However, there is a small risk of problems/complications:

  • Bleeding – this is usually light and no intervention is required. Rarely, additional procedures may be required to stop or manage the bleeding.
  • Postoperative infection – usually prevented by a ‘one-off’ dose of prophylactic antibiotics at the time of surgery or treated with a course of antibiotics after the procedure.
  • Excess fluid may build up in your system.
  • The uterus or cervix can be punctured (perforation) by the hysteroscope or other instruments. Usually no intervention is required and there are no future adverse effects.
    • In most studies, hysteroscopy is complicated by confirmed uterine perforation in approximately 1 percent of operative hysteroscopies. There are fewer perforations during diagnostic hysteroscopy.
    • Rarely, if there is significant bleeding or concern about injury to other organs e.g. bowel, further procedures such as laparoscopy (telescope in the abdomen) or laparotomy (larger incision in the abdomen) may be necessary.

HOW IS HYSTEROSCOPY PERFORMED AND WHAT CAN I EXPECT AFTERWARDS?

These important aspects are discussed in the patient information leaflet below, titled Hysteroscopy.

Patient Information (PDFs)

DECIDING ON THE BEST TREATMENT OPTION CAN SOMETIMES BE CHALLENGING. YOUR SYMPTOMS AND INDIVIDUAL CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD FORM THE BASIS OF ANY DECISION-MAKING. A SPECIALIST GYNAECOLOGIST CAN HELP GUIDE YOU THROUGH THIS PROCESS

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COVID-19 UPDATE:
Outpatient clinics are currently closed. During this time Mr de Rosnay will be offering pre-booked telephone or video consultations.   For further information, please contact his Medical PA.

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